The Australian Apple leak story

Dickson told Reuters he has five to 10 sources in China who buy Apple prototype parts directly from factory-line workers, which are then sold from $250 to $500. His sources then send him photos and videos of the parts, which are posted under his name on his website and YouTube channel, which generate ad revenue.
— Reuters

Hot off heels after my yesterday's post on Apple and Secrecy (2) , I found this article on an Australian 'Apple leaker'. The interview just goes to emphasize how lucrative this business surrounding Apple's product secrecy is. As I mentioned yesterday, the root cause of this is Apple's manufacturing being out of their direct control and how cheap the labor is in China. The prototype parts are sold for $250 - $500, which is a great amount of money for these Chinese workers!

He may not think or know he’s doing the wrong thing, but a court would say Apple is one of the most tight and restricted IT producers in the world, notorious for locking things down,
— David Vaile, Executive Director, Cyberspace Law and Policy Centre, University of NSW, Sydney

Though he might not be aware of anything illegal about what he is doing, Apple has shown in the past that it does not look down easily on such stints, remember the iPhone 4 incident. And though Apple declined to comment and Dickson told Reuters that he will stop if Apple asks him to, I am sure Apple is looking into such leaks and on ways to curb them.

From the iPhone 4 incident, these surprises started dwindling and the rumors started morphing in to leaks and this made Apple product releases far less less fun for technology fanatics and enthusiasts like me!

But the big picture, as I mentioned yesterday is that Apple likes to surprise its users and its users likewise want to be surprised. Somehow from the iPhone 4 incident, these surprises started dwindling and the rumors started morphing in to leaks and this made Apple product releases far less less fun for technology fanatics and enthusiasts like me!  Remember the first time we saw an iPhone 4 was through a blurry very unimpressive image from Gizmodo and not on the iconic glitter studded Apple's stage like the first gen iPhone.