Apple Music compared to its rivals

For many a years, there has been a notion that Apple never invents anything from the ground up. There were MP3 players before the iPod, there were definitely desktop computers before the iMac, there were laptops before the Power Books, there were "smartphones" before the iPhone, there were tablets before the iPad and lastly there were "smartwatches" before the Apple Watch. So Apple has always been technically late to the game. But what Apple does best is, Apple waits; it waits till a product is revolutionary. You don't have to be the first to the market if your product turns out to be the best one in the market. 

Apple Music (Image Source: Apple.com)

Apple Music (Image Source: Apple.com)

There is also a fringe advantage for not being the first to the market. You get to see others make mistakes from which you can actually learn! In a lot of ways Apple Music has been a similar story. We learnt recently from Apple's WWDC that Apple Music has 15 million paid subscribers (via CNET). What does this number mean compared to its competitors. Like many critics deemed, has Apple's late entry to the game, spoilt its riches? Horace Dediu answers this question with some insightful charts, here

Apple did not have to move first in music subscriptions. It did not even have to move second or third. When it did move it could just skim the market and add to its already healthy Services revenue. Missing the boat in music in this case meant capturing all the value quickly and with minimal expense.
— Horace Dediu, Asymco